CLONED: The Recreator Chronicles Review

CLONED: The Recreator Chronicles is an insightful adventure into the psychological. Nothing is what it seems and that's exactly the advantage director Gregory Orr. As I watched, I couldn't even tell what would happen. Some people just don't get this film, it's not really for everyone, it's basically for people who are waiting to be surprised. Somehow, after watching with a group of friends, they told me that the script was too dull, but what I told them really hit home: this isn't just The Invasion of the Body Snatchers, this is something more sinister and needs much more thought behind it.

What happens when your double is better, faster, stronger, and becomes the doer. There's no place for hesitance, fear, and uncertainty. Humanity has been confronted with something else, but human created--the conundrum is not entirely visible until you learn towards the end. It's not really like a catch-22 scenario, but it's something that edges towards humanity's drive towards perfection, of the ultimate need to conquer the previous generation.

CLONED: The Recreator Chronicles was directed by Gregory Orr and stars Stella Maeve, Alexander Nifong, J. Mallory McCree, John de Lancie, and Laura Moss. The acting was absolutely brilliant, convincing and fluid. The casting is peculiar, because the actors seemed either incredibly talented or really damn good directing from Orr. I'd say it was a combination, a synthesis of clever directing and intriguing cinematography that really nails this one home.

I would classify this film as non-mainstream. Lots of people just don't get this movie, where it's going and what it's really about. It's about the final question, who really is the person responsible and what was his motive? What is the point of their experiment and why did it need to happen? There are loads of questions that will leave you puzzled, that's the beauty of Recreator, you really aren't finished with the movie just yet.

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